True Crime Psychology and Personality: Narcissism, Psychopathy, and the Minds of Dangerous Criminals
CASE: Chris Watts, Familicide, and Revenge

CASE: Chris Watts, Familicide, and Revenge

January 31, 2020

This episode discusses the Chris Watts murder case in relation to our understanding of familicide. There's actually a lot of information available in the literature about familicide and yet you'll see kind of a narrowing in on the Chris Watts case without considering that larger context. Sometimes in research and just in trying to gain knowledge in general we have to step back from something to get a clear view of it.

The types of familicide:

Immortality - murders committed in an attempt to immortalize the family - perpetrator “protects” the family, believing that death is better than poverty.

Need for control - perpetrator commits the final act of control by killing the entire family - perpetrator views the family as a singular unit and does not differentiate between individuals.

Suicide - perpetrator kills the spouse and children because he believes they are unable to go on without their head of household - perpetrator is also driven by a desire to protect the family from the shame of having a parent commit suicide

Revenge - tied to sexual jealousy - perpetrator believes the spouse or ex-spouse has been unfaithful - children are seen equally responsible for any betrayal

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Ars Longa Media

To learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media 

Citations 

Liem, M., & Koenraadt, F. (2008). Familicide: a comparison with spousal and child homicide by mentally disordered perpetrators. Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health, 18(5), 306–318.

Liem, M., Levin, J., Holland, C., & Fox, J. (2013). The Nature and Prevalence of Familicide in the United States, 2000-2009. Journal of Family Violence, 28(4), 351–358

Mailloux, S. (2014). Fatal Families: Why Children are Killed in Familicide Occurrences. Journal of Family Violence, 29(8), 921–926

Sachmann, M., & Harris Johnson, C. M. (2014). The Relevance of Long-Term Antecedents in Assessing the Risk of Familicide-Suicide Following Separation. Child Abuse Review, 23(2), 130–141. 

 

CASE: Chris Watts Psychopathy, Narcissism, Infidelity and Murder

CASE: Chris Watts Psychopathy, Narcissism, Infidelity and Murder

January 27, 2020

This episodes delves into the potential personality characteristics present in the Chris Watts case? There are a number of theories about these murders including those involving psychopathy, narcissism, rage, impulsivity, and infidelity. The details of these murders are horrific.

In 2018, Chris Watts murdered his wife, Shanann Watts (who was 15 weeks pregnant), and his daughters (Bella, age 4 & Celeste, age 3). Chris was involved in an affair at the time with Nichol Lee Kessinger.

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For even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channel

Ars Longa Media

To learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media 

Citations

Westfall, S. S., Frederick, S. H. I., Baker, K., Boudin, M., & Truesdell, J. (2018). The Watts Family Murders SECRETS & LIES. People, 90(12), 52.

Westfall, S. S., Baker, K. c., & Helling, S. (2018). The Watts Family Murders A MONSTER’S DOUBLE LIFE. People, 90(25), 63.

NARCISSISM: Malignant Narcissism and Narcissism in the Workplace

NARCISSISM: Malignant Narcissism and Narcissism in the Workplace

January 27, 2020

This episode discusses questions like What is a malignant narcissist? And How does malignant narcissism manifest in work settings?

Malignant narcissism in general refers to an individual has a combination of characteristics related to narcissistic personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, paranoia, and ego-syntonic sadism and aggression.

There are two types of psychopathy: Factor 1 (primary, interpersonal affective) and Factor 2 (lifestyle, antisocial) psychopathy. Factor 1 psychopathy has characteristics like grandiosity, pathological lying, manipulation, a superficial charm, callous, unemotional, low neuroticism and lack of guilt or remorse. Factor 2 psychopathy has a parasitic lifestyle, being prone to boredom, sensation seeking, impulsivity, irresponsibility, a failure to have long term goals, poor behavioral controls, and criminal versatility.

There are two types of narcissism: With grandiose narcissism we see characteristics like being extroverted, socially bold, self-confident, having a superficial charm, being resistant to criticism, and being callous and unemotional. Vulnerable narcissism is characterized by shame, anger, aggression, hypersensitivity, a tendency to be introverted, defensive, avoidant, anxious, depressed, socially awkward, and shy.

 

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Ars Longa Media

To learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media 

Citations

Kernberg OF: Severe Personality Disorders. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1984.

Kernberg OF: Aggression in Personality Disorders and Perversions. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992.

Kernberg OF: Aggressivity, Narcissism, and Self- Destructiveness in the Psychotherapeutic Relationship. Yale University Press, 2004.

NARCISSISM: Causes of Narcissistic Personality Disorder and Differences from Psychopathy

NARCISSISM: Causes of Narcissistic Personality Disorder and Differences from Psychopathy

January 27, 2020

This episode covers how to tell the difference between a psychopath and a narcissist, and what causes narcissistic personality disorder. When we use the term psychopath, we're talking about some who has trait psychopathy and when we use the term narcissist, we're talking about someone who has trait narcissism. Narcissism has two types: grandiose and vulnerable. Primary psychopathy has characteristics like being callous, unemotional, pathological lying, being manipulative, and being bold (fearless dominance). Secondary psychopathy has characteristics like being irresponsible, being impulsive, having a need for stimulation, and being involved in activities that could result in arrest. Grandiose narcissism has fantasies of success and power, jealousy, a sense of entitlement, arrogance, and being manipulative. With vulnerable narcissism, we see some of the same characteristics like insecurity, hypersensitivity to criticism, shame, guilt, and sadness.

Oftentimes an individual with Narcissistic Personality Disorder wants to be recognized as superior, believes they are so complex and amazing that they can only be understood by special people, has low self-esteem, devalues the contributions of others, and is condescending. Criticism is not well received by most people with Narcissistic Personality Disorder. The prevalence of Narcissistic Personality Disorder is about 1%.

Heritability accounts for somewhere between 40% and 65% to the development of NPD. Some structural changes in the brain have also been identified. Experiences in early childhood may also contribute to the development of narcissistic personality disorder. Risk factors include when a child receives excessive praise and also excessive criticism, lack of parental empathy, praise for abilities or appearance instead of other characteristics, and an emphasis on status or achieving success. Other potential ideological factors include emotional abuse and neglect.

00:30 - How to Tell the Difference Between a Psychopath and a Narcissist

21:00 - What Causes Narcissistic Personality Disorder 

More Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder

For even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channel

Ars Longa Media

To learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media 

 

CASE: Aaron Hernandez and Netflix’s Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez

CASE: Aaron Hernandez and Netflix’s Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez

January 27, 2020

This episodes dives into the mental mental health and personality characteristics at work in Aaron Hernandez case. It is based on  the Netflix series: Killer inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez.

Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) is a Cluster B personality disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) APSD has seven symptom criteria:

1: Repeated unlawful behaviors

2: Consistent deceitfulness

3: Impulsivity, poor planning

4: Aggressiveness, physical fights

5: Reckless disregard for safety

6: Consistent irresponsibility

7: Lack of remorse

More Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder

For even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channel

Ars Longa Media

To learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media 

Citations

Killer inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez, 2020 Hollin Gregory, 2020, Making a murderer: Media renderings of brain injury and Aaron Hernandez as a medical and sporting subject, Social Science & Medicine, Volume 244, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2.... (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/...

ANTISOCIAL: Characteristics, Criminality, and Associated Disorders

ANTISOCIAL: Characteristics, Criminality, and Associated Disorders

January 27, 2020

This episode answers questions about the relationship between co-occurring disorders, antisocial personality, and criminal offending. 

With antisocial personality disorder we see seven symptoms in the symptom criteria: repeatedly violating society's norms so, engaging a behavior that could be grounds for arrest, deceitfulness, impulsivity, irritability and aggression, a disregard for the safety of self and others, being irresponsible, and a lack of remorse. The prevalence of Antisocial Personality Disorder is about 3% of males and 1% of females. About 70% - 80% of males in prison may have Antisocial Personality Disorder. Sociopathy and psychopathy are sets of characteristics that represent distinct patterns of behavior and etiology, but are still under the Antisocial Personality Disorder classification. Generally, a person suffering from sociopathy is thought to have developed the disorder as a result of a stressor, such as trauma. Genetics are thought to be responsible for psychopathy. Both are associated with criminal activity, however, sociopathy is associated with impulsive criminal acts whereas psychopathy is associated with planned crimes. Meaningful relationships are difficult to form with psychopathy, but slightly easier to form with sociopathy. Sociopathy is associated with mood dysphoria and dysregulation, whereas psychopathy is associated with remaining more emotionally stable. Psychopathy is associated with being cold and calculating, and considering the consequences of behavior more carefully than in sociopathy. Also, in ASPD generally we see a decreased ability to experience what are referred to as “complex emotions,” specifically guilt, trust, respect, and closeness. Individuals with antisocial personality disorder have a greater risk of experiencing difficulty recalling emotional information and they tend to have a fairly good memory when it comes to negative affect, but a poor memory for positive emotions.

A co-occurring disorder is when there's a presentation that has both, a substance use disorder and a mental disorder. We know that the prevalence of co-occurring disorders in prison populations and forensic populations is somewhere between 70 and 80%. We also know there's an association between co-occurring disorders and violence increased likelihood of being incarcerated and increased criminal recidivism. Notably, the association between mental disorders in general and violence is actually fairly low. The prevalence of violent behavior in individuals without any mental disorder is just over 2%. With substance use disorders alone it's just under 20%, and with co-occurring disorders it's around 22%.

00:30 - What is Co-occurring Disorders and Criminality

07: 15 - What is ASPD

15:55 - What are the emotional and cognitive characteristics of ASPD 

More Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder

For even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channel

Ars Longa Media

To learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media 

Citations

Ogloff, J. R. P., Talevski, D., Lemphers, A., Wood, M., & Simmons, M. (2015). Co-occurring mental illness, substance use disorders, and antisocial personality disorder among clients of forensic mental health services. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 38(1), 16–23.

 

PSYCHOLOGY: Psychopathy, Sociopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder and the Psychopath’s “Intelligence”

PSYCHOLOGY: Psychopathy, Sociopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder and the Psychopath’s “Intelligence”

January 23, 2020

This episode delves into topics like What is psychopathy? What's the relationship between antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy? What's the difference between primary and secondary psychopathy (sociopathy)? And is there a relationship between psychopathy and intelligence? 

When talking about psychopathy, a lot of times we think of antisocial personality disorder. These two constructs, psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder, are similar but distinct. Psychopathy is similar to all of the Cluster B personality disorders: antisocial, narcissistic, and to a lesser extent it is associated with borderline and histrionic personality disorder. The way we could think of these two constructs, psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder, would be that antisocial personality disorder is defined mostly based on behaviors and psychopathy is defined partially on behaviors, but it also adds this interpersonal component

To understand antisocial personality disorder we look in the DSM and we see that there are seven symptom criteria and then three other criteria. The seven symptom criteria are violating social norms, lying, impulsivity, irritability and aggression, disregarding others’ safety, irresponsibility, and lack of remorse. Then we have the other criteria. An individual has to be 18 years or older, evidence of conduct disorder would have had to have been present before the age of 15, and the symptoms of antisocial personality disorder can't occur exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. We think of psychopathy as a subset of antisocial personality disorder. A number of the studies on antisocial personality and psychopathy look at male criminal offenders in the prison population. Here we see that around 70 – 80 % percent of those individuals qualify for a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, but only about 15-25% could be classified as having psychopathy.

When we look at the construct of psychopathy a little more closely we see that it can be divided in the two major types: primary versus secondary psychopathy. A lot of times the term primary psychopathy can be synonymous with the term psychopathy. Secondary psychopathy is sometimes referred to as sociopathy. Additionally, sometimes when individuals use sociopathy, they're really talking about psychopathy as opposed to just secondary psychopathy. When we look at primary psychopathy we know there are certain characteristics associated with it: being unemotional, callous, manipulative, calculating, having little or no fear, guilt, remorse, empathy, or anxiety. We also tend to think of primary psychopathy as having an etiology that is genetic more so than environmental. Psychopathy has a fairly strong association with antisocial personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder. When we talk about secondary psychopathy, we see a different set of characteristics. Secondary psychopathy is more associated with criminal behavior than is primary psychopathy. We also see a number of other characteristics: being rash, impulsive, emotional, anxious, hostile, aggressive, volatile, and self-destructive. Individuals that secondary psychopathy also tend to be more disorganized and tend to have a risky decision-making style when compared to individuals with primary psychopathy.

What is the association between psychopathy and intelligence? When we think of the word “psychopathy,” there is this idea that psychopathic traits are related to intelligence, meaning the more we see of psychopathy, the higher level of intelligence we see. This goes back in the media in terms of movies, television, and even early research into psychopathy and intelligence. Research has found that there is no relationship between psychopathy and intelligence.

00:30 - What is psychopathy? 

08:55 - Is there a relation between psychopathy and intelligence

15:30 - What's the difference between primary and secondary psychopathy? 

More Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder

For even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channel

Ars Longa Media

To learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media 

 

Citations

Watts, A. L., Salekin, R. T., Harrison, N., Clark, A., Waldman, I. D., Vitacco, M. J., & Lilienfeld, S. O. (2016). Psychopathy: Relations with three conceptions of intelligence. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, And Treatment, 7(3), 269-279. doi:10.1037/per0000183 

The podcast is for informational and educational purposes only. Nothing on this show is intended to substitute for the treatment or advice provided by a licensed mental health professional.

  

True Crime Psychology and Personality: Narcissism, Psychopathy and the Minds of Dangerous Criminals

True Crime Psychology and Personality: Narcissism, Psychopathy and the Minds of Dangerous Criminals

January 22, 2020

The debut podcast from Ars Longa Media, True Crime Psychology and Personality discusses the personality traits behind some of the most infamous, violent criminals. Building on the success of his YouTube channel, this podcast features Dr. Todd Grande's scientifically informed profiles of famous criminals and analyses of the psychopathology of serial killers and other villains. The Dark Tetrad of personality is narcissism, psychopathy, sadism, and Machiavellianism. The personalities profiled in this show demonstrate the worst manifestations of these pathological traits. Subscribe now to learn more about the narcissists, psychopaths, and sociopaths who make the news for committing unspeakable acts of evil. It's not just about the stories, it's about the science and psychology behind them.  

To learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media 

The podcast is for informational and educational purposes only. Nothing on this show is intended to substitute for the treatment or advice provided by a licensed mental health professional.

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